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Living Sky School Division No. 202
Growth Without Limits, Learning For All
School Division No. 202
Alternative-Augmentative Communication (AAC)

Approximately 1.3% of all individuals have such significant communication disabilities that they can not rely on their natural speech to meet their daily communication needs (Beukelman & Mirenda, 2005).

The use of AAC allows students with significant communication disabilities to communicate and maintain relationships with people in their everyday environments.

Potential AAC users:

  • Non-verbal individuals
  • Individuals with Apraxia of Speech
  • Individuals with Down Syndrome
  • Individuals with Autism
  • Individuals diagnosed with Cerebral Palsy
  • Overall, individuals with low intelligibility

Unaided versus Aided communication systems:

  • Unaided (no technology): eye contact, facial expressions, gestures, proximity
  • Aided: picture symbols, electronic communication aids (iPad, iPod, BigMac, GoTalk, switches, etc)

Can Pictures Help Children with Autism? (SuperDuper, Handy Handouts)

Augmentative and Alternative Communication: Terms to Know (SuperDuper, Handy Handouts)

Augmentative and Alternative Communication: F​requently Asked Questions (SuperDuper, Handy Handouts)

EVERYONE HAS THE RIGHT AND POTENTIAL TO COMMUNICATE!!​